The songs that save your life

Awhile back Chris over at Rainbow Alliance wrote a brilliant blog entitled Music is Emotion.  Since then, I’ve been thinking about songs that have pulled me through, made me smile or maybe just affirmed in one way or another that it was all gonna be okay.

I worked at a record store on Vermont in the late 90s and early 2000’s in Los Angeles. Being around that much music was an education. Anything I was remotely curious about, I could listen to. And that’s what I continued to do as an employee, a deejay and a music lover. Little did I know I was also building an army of musical soldiers whose songs would come to my rescue when times were tough.

Flash forward 9 or so years when music’s healing powers were needed more than ever. As I tried to shake off 20 years of drinking and using drugs and end a 12 year relationship at the same time, my iPod headphones needed to act as a sign that life was more than this and that things would change.  They just had to. See, music has always been able to do and say what mere mortals never could- tell the truth, give me hope and make me listen. When Chrissie Hynde says “The reason we’re here, a man and woman, is to love each other, take care of  each other.” I believe her. When I feel like the world is conspiring against me and Bjork tells me “It’s not up to you. It never really was.” I know deep down in my bones, she’s right. When my heart is breaking, sometimes Dorothy Moore is the only one who understands. When I think human intelligence is non-existent, Elvis Costello proves me wrong time and time again. Music can’t solve all of my probelms but my world  is certainly more bleak without it.

In that first year of recovery, there were some songs I listened to over and over again. Jenny Lewis of Rilo Kiley fame personally kept me from jumping off a cliff about a dozen times that year with her beautiful and soul shaking songs from her Acid Tongue record. But it was Godspeed that made the tears drip down my cheek and told me I could get through all of the crap I was going through. The words, “No good, no how no man should treat you like he do” rung true and gave me the strength I didn’t have on my own. Kate Bush’s “Cloudbursting”suddenly had new hope behind it when she sang, “I just know that something good is going happen. I don’t know when but just saying it could even make it happen.”Paddy Casey, Annie Lennox, David Bowie, Jill Scott, M83, and even Kelly Clarkson were some of the  other artists I had to lean on that year too.

Yet when it came the song that proved the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t a speeding train, I had to look to Doly Parton. Say what you will about Dolly but she’s a badass songwriter, an amazing musicain and can harmonize with a buzzsaw. The Light of the Clear Blue Morning is a song she’s recorded several times in different decades. It’s now become a standard for choirs and choral groups. You can easily see why. For me, the song played in mind when I walked home from difficult doctors appontments or struggled to get through days without thinking about using. It wasn’t even on my iPod but playing in my brain, on repeat. Until I believed it. And eventually I did and the days of crying with the iPod became less frequent. And Dolly was right.

So if you’re struggling, get yourself a theme song or a mantra or a soundtrack. And if you dont have one, feel free to borrow mine.

Its been a long dark night
And Ive been a waitin for the morning
Its been a long hard fight
But I see a brand new day a dawning
Ive been looking for the sunshine
Cause I aint seen it in so long
But everythings gonna work out just fine
Everythings gonna be all right
That’s been all wrong

Cause I can see the light of a clear blue morning
I can see the light of a brand new day
I can see the light of a clear blue morning
And everythings gonna be all right
Its gonna be okay

The Light of Clear Blue Morning, Dolly Parton

 

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7 thoughts on “The songs that save your life

  1. Oh wow this is a fantastic post-thank you! Some of the artists/songs you referred to I know, but I gotta say, Dolly wasn’t one of them! So today, I will seek out that song, because those lyrics were simple, and true. The best kind really. Any headphone suggestions? I’m totally old school, and hate the earbuds.

  2. I couldn’t agree more. Music has always been there, or at least since I was 8 or so. It’s held me since then in its grip. My playlists might be different than yours, but that doesn’t matter. As a lyricist and somewhat songwriter myself, it’s an unbelievable release.

    All of the tattoos on my left arm or about music in some way, including headphones, kanji for “music”, and a fox surfing a bass guitar (my first instrument). I have lines from two different poems I wrote about music on there. The one I’m going to list here is “Song, my sacred paradise”. I had that line first, and it took awhile to finally write the rest of it in a way with which I was happy. The full couplet, once written, turned out very pertinent to your post, in multiple ways: “Oldest friend, my sweetest vice, my song, my sacred paradise”.

    • “Oldest friend, my sweetest vice, my song, my sacred paradise”. Wow. That’s beautiful, Fox. So much more poetic than my neurotic ramblings. But yeah music is the best therapist. It’s literally pulled me out of the whole so many times. I thankfully saved you guys from my religious experience that happened with Stevie Nicks.

  3. For me, it was Sade’s “By Your Side”, during a particularly bad patch in 2003:

    “When you’re on the outside baby and you can’t get in
    I will show you, you’re so much better than you know
    When you’re lost and you’re alone and you can’t get back again
    I will find you, darling and I will bring you home”

    But there have been MANY others! 🙂

    • Oh that’s an incredible song. I love that song. I love it so much in fact that when the cover of it by Beachwood Sparks plays during Scott Pilgrim vs the World, I totally started crying. Ridiculous. The power of Sade.

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